Category: Publication

Black Twitter: The rather short list of peer-reviewed literature

I’m compiling a list of peer-reviewed research on Black Twitter. At the moment I use the term list in the broadest sense possible because I have only found three papers that focus specifically and primarily on Black Twitter.

Brock, A. (2012). From the Blackhand Side: Twitter as a Cultural Conversation. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 56(4), 529–549. [doi:10.1080/08838151.2012.732147]

Florini, S. (2013). Tweets, Tweeps, and Signifyin’: Communication and Cultural Performance on “Black Twitter.” Television & New Media. [doi:10.1177/1527476413480247]

Sharma, S. (2013). Black Twitter ?: Racial Hashtags , Networks and Contagion. New Formations: a Journal of Culture/Theory/Politics, 78, 46–64. [doi:10.3898/NEWF.78.02.2013] [Draft PDF]

I am of course relying on more than journals for my research on Black Twitter and I will be compiling a list of non-peer reviewed sources soon; but for now if anyone knows of any paper that should be on this list please let met know.

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Race and racism in Internet Studies: A review and critique

New Media and Society‘s latest release is a special release focusing on  the Rise of Internet Studies.  Of particular interest to to anyone researching race and the internet is  Jessie Daniel‘s article,  Race and racism in Internet Studies: A review and critique.

Abstract:

Race and racism persist online in ways that are both new and unique to the Internet, alongside vestiges of centuries-old forms that reverberate significantly both offline and on. As we mark 15 years into the field of Internet studies, it becomes necessary to assess what the extant research tells us about race and racism. This paper provides an analysis of the literature on race and racism in Internet studies in the broad areas of (1) race and the structure of the Internet, (2) race and racism matters in what we do online, and (3) race, social control and Internet law. Then, drawing on a range of theoretical perspectives, including Hall’s spectacle of the Other and DuBois’s view of white culture, the paper offers an analysis and critique of the field, in particular the use of racial formation theory. Finally, the paper points to the need for a critical understanding of whiteness in Internet studies.

Read full article (this is not an Open Access to journal)

Reference:  Daniels, Jessie. “Race and Racism in Internet Studies: A Review and Critique.” New Media & Society 15, no. 5 ( 2013): 695–719. DOI: 10.1177/1461444812462849

Agenda for thinking about ‘race’ in development

Professor Uma Kothari’s 2006 paper questions the silence on race in development.

Abstract:

This paper reveals some of the silences about ‘race’ in development ideologies, institutions and practices. It suggests that these mask the perpetuation of a racialized discourse in development, its complicity with broader historical and contemporary racial projects and the effects of ‘race’ on the processes and consequences of development. The paper provides an agenda for understanding development in terms of ‘race’ and identifies three potential areas for further investigation. The first is the continuing legacy of colonial constructions and the persistence of forms of racial difference and hierarchy in development. The second concerns the power of whiteness and specifically how authority, expertise and knowledge become racially symbolized. The third area for further examination is how ‘race’ is disguised through the use of specialized terminology and criteria in accounting for poverty and social exclusion. The paper concludes by suggesting that debates around multiculturalism and anti-racism could inform a shift away from racialized representations and inequalities prevailing in development.

Read the full article

Reference: Kothari, U. “An Agenda for Thinking about ‘Race’ in Development.” Progress in Development Studies 6, no. 1(2006) : 9-23.

Race and/as Technology; or, How to Do Things to Race

A paper by Wendy Hui Kyong Chun

Excerpt from the Introduction

This special issue poses the questions: to what degree are race and technology intertwined? Can race be considered a technology or a form of media—that is, not only a mechanism, but also a practical or industrial art? Could race be not simply an object of representation and portrayal, of knowledge or truth, but also a technique that one uses, even as one is used by it—a carefully crafted, historically inflected system of tools, mediation, or enframing that builds history and identity?

Read the full article [PDF]

Reference Chun, W.H.K.  (2009)  Race and/as Technology; or, How to Do Things to Race.  Camera Obscura 70, 24(1) pp 7 -35

See also Crowdsourced review at Hastac